Ballet Hispanico
 

Archive Collaboration





 
BH Archive: Ballet Hispanico Company program
from an early presentation at the Hunter College
Playhouse, November 15 -16, 1975
BH Archive: Ballet Hispanico Company photograph
from choreographer Vicente Nebrada’s work Group
Portrait of a Lady
, 1983 (c) Kenn Duncan
BH Archive: Ballet Hispanico Founder Tina Ramirez
and dancer Antonio Santaella performing on a public
field in New York City, 1971 (c) Newsweek
BH Archive: Founder Tina Ramirez and students from
the School of Dance at Ballet Hispanico, 1968 (c) Frank Quevedo
BH Archive: Ballet Hispanico Company photograph
from choreographer Geoffrey Holder's work Danse Creole.
Men (left): Alfredo Gonzalez, Marcial Gonzalez, Roy Roldriguez,
Lorenzo Maldonado, Ramon Galindo. Women (right): Annette
White, Jacqueline Fletcher, Valerie Contreras, Nancy Ticotin,
Judith Reyes. 1971 (c) Claude Le-Anh
BH Archive: Ballet Hispanico Company photograph
from choreographer Alvin Ailey's work Quintet.
Women (left): Rachel Ticotin, Michele Ceballis,
unknown, Sandra Rivera, 1973/4
 

Archival Collaboration: Ballet Hispanico and Hunter College’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies

Over the last forty years under the leadership of Founder Tina Ramirez, Ballet Hispanico has remained an important artistic interpreter and educator of the Latin American experience in the American cultural landscape. Ms. Ramirez stepped down as the Artistic Director of Ballet Hispanico in June 2009. Under new artistic leadership, it is imperative that her tremendous artistic legacy and dedication to sharing the diversity of Latino cultures is preserved.

Archival quality preservation, digitization, and an accessible public platform for these dance works and the many unique materials from Tina and Ballet Hispanico’s history is necessary to help share the evolution of Latino contemporary dance.

In this effort, Ballet Hispanico partnered with Hunter College’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies (“Centro”) in 2009 to archive the collective effects of Ballet Hispanico and Tina Ramirez. The project is ongoing and will be completed in three phases. Phase One is a collaboration between Ballet Hispanico and Centro to collect, document, and preserve our archival materials, which began in 2010. In Phase Two, Centro will create the official archival catalogue for Ballet Hispanico. Centro will also move the collection to their upstate facility for archival-quality preservation and storage. In Phase Three, Ballet Hispanico will work with Centro to digitize a large selection of the materials and make a special selection of the effects accessible to the public through our bi-lingual website and a series of special events.

We look forward to sharing our collection with a greater segment of the population. On this page is a selected sample of the archive. The public will eventually be able to view actual items from the archives through Centro. As Ballet Hispanico’s legacy continues over time, Centro will continue to receive additional archival effects from the organization.



 

 


 
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